Fluid Intake in Critically Ill Patients: The “Save Useless Fluids For Intensive Resuscitation” Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study - Inria - Institut national de recherche en sciences et technologies du numérique Access content directly
Journal Articles Critical Care Medicine Year : 2023

Fluid Intake in Critically Ill Patients: The “Save Useless Fluids For Intensive Resuscitation” Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study

Dorothée Carpentier
  • Function : Author
Jean-Pierre Quenot
  • Function : Author

Abstract

Objectives: Patients at risk of adverse effects related to positive fluid balance could benefit from fluid intake optimization. Less attention is paid to nonresuscitation fluids. We aim to evaluate the heterogeneity of fluid intake at the initial phase of resuscitation. Design: Prospective multicenter cohort study. Setting: Thirty ICUs across France and one in Spain. Patients: Patients requiring vasopressors and/or invasive mechanical ventilation. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: All fluids administered by vascular or enteral lines were recorded over 24 hours following admission and were classified in four main groups according to their predefined indication: fluids having a well-documented homeostasis goal (resuscitation fluids, rehydration, blood products, and nutrition), drug carriers, maintenance fluids, and fluids for technical needs. Models of regression were constructed to determine fluid intake predicted by patient characteristics. Centers were classified according to tertiles of fluid intake. The cohort included 296 patients. The median total volume of fluids was 3546 mL (interquartile range, 2441–4955 mL), with fluids indisputably required for body fluid homeostasis representing 36% of this total. Saline, glucose-containing high chloride crystalloids, and balanced crystalloids represented 43%, 27%, and 16% of total volume, respectively. Whatever the class of fluids, center of inclusion was the strongest factor associated with volumes. Compared with the first tertile, the difference between the volume predicted by patient characteristics and the volume given was +1.2 ± 2.0 L in tertile 2 and +3.0 ± 2.8 L in tertile 3. Conclusions: Fluids indisputably required for body fluid homeostasis represent the minority of fluid intake during the 24 hours after ICU admission. Center effect is the strongest factor associated with the volume of fluids. Heterogeneity in practices suggests that optimal strategies for volume and goals of common fluids administration need to be developed.
No file

Dates and versions

hal-04343611 , version 1 (13-12-2023)

Identifiers

Cite

Frédérique Schortgen, Cécilia Tabra Osorio, Dorothée Carpentier, Matthieu Henry, Pascal Beuret, et al.. Fluid Intake in Critically Ill Patients: The “Save Useless Fluids For Intensive Resuscitation” Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study. Critical Care Medicine, 2023, ⟨10.1097/CCM.0000000000006091⟩. ⟨hal-04343611⟩
78 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Mastodon Facebook X LinkedIn More